Shell3 
1920's - 1961
Shell5 
1962 - 1972 
Shell4 
1972- 1998
Shell1 
1999 - 

Maps with years in red are not in my collection - scans of covers have been provided by other collectors.

Shell 1930 Cover Icon
1930
CoverIcon 
1931
 Cover Icon 32
1932
Cover Icon 33
1933
Cover Icon 34
1934
CoverIcon 
1935
1935 Hamilton Toronto Cover Icon
1935 Toronto
& Hamilton
1936 Shell Cover Icon
1936
 1937 Shell Cover Icon
1937
1938 Hamilton Toronto Cover Icon
1938 Toronto
& Hamilton
CoverIcon
 1939
1939 Ottawa Quebec Cover Icon
1939 Ottawa
& Quebec
CoverIcon 
1939 Toronto
& Hamilton 
CoverIcon 
1940
 CoverIcon
1940 Toronto
& Hamilton
1941 Shell Cover Icon
1941
1945 Shell Cover Icon
1945
Cover Icon 
1946
CDN Version
CoverIcon
1946
US Version 
CoverIcon 
1947 Toronto
& Hamilton
1947 Ottawa Shell Cover Icon
1947
Ottawa
CoverIcon
1948
CoverIcon 
1949 
 1949 Hamilton Toronto Cover Icon
1949 Toronto
& Hamilton 
CoverIcon 
1951
1952 Shell Cover Icon
1952 
1952 Toronto Cover Icon
1952 Toronto
Cover Icon1953
1953 Toronto Cover Icon
1953 Toronto
Cover Icon 54
1954
CoverIcon
1955
1955 Toronto Cover Icon
1955 Toronto 
1956 Hamilton Cover Icon
1956 Hamilton
CoverIcon
1957 
CoverIcon 
1958
1958 Toronto Cover Icon
1958 Toronto
59 Shell Cover Icon
1959
1959 Toronto Cover Icon
1959 Toronto
1960 Shell Cover Icon
1960
1960 Hamilton Cover Icon
1960 Hamilton
 60 Shell Ottawa Cover Icon
1960
Ottawa
1960 Toronto Cover Icon
1960 Toronto
CoverIcon 
1961
61 Shell Hamilton Cover Icon
1961
Hamilton
Cover Icon
1961
Toronto
CoverIcon 
1962
CDN Version  
Cover Icon 62 US
1962
US Version
CoverIcon
 1963
1963 Hamilton Cover Icon
1963 Hamilton
CoverIcon 
1963 Ottawa
CoverIcon 
1964
1964 Ottawa Cover Icon
1964 Ottawa
 1964 Toronto Cover Icon
1964 Toronto
 CoverIcon
1965
 CoverIcon 
1967
 CoverIcon
1968
1968 Ottawa Cover Icon
1968 Ottawa
70 Cover Icon
1970
 1970 Toronto Cover Icon
1970 Toronto
CoverIcon
1971
CoverIcon
1972 
CoverIcon
1972 - 74
 1973 Toronto Cover Icon
1973 Toronto
 

shell station
 
Shell Station Toronto 1960s
The Royal Dutch/Shell Group incorporated its Canadian business in 1911 with a capital of only $50,000 (or about $1 million in today’s dollars.)   The company opened its Longue Pointe Bunkering Plant in Montréal with just six employees a few weeks later.  This was just four years after the Royal Dutch Petroleum Company and the "Shell" Transport and Trading Company had merged in the international marketplace.
Initially headquartered in a tiny office on the corner of St. Catherine and Peel Streets in Montréal, the Shell Company of Canada served a market in which there were only 34,000 motor vehicles registered in the entire country, consuming less than five million gallons of gasoline per year. The only other major markets for petroleum products at the time were kerosene for lighting and diesel fuel for ships.
In 1914, the British Admiralty took over Shell's Longue Pointe Refinery to use as a fuelling station for ships. Since Longue Pointe was the company's only operation in Canada, for seven long years it found itself twiddling its corporate thumbs with nothing to do, while competitors heavily exploited the wartime boom in the oil industry.  When the Admiralty finally returned Longue Pointe to Shell in 1921, the company re-entered a changed market, where its competitors had a major head start. Companies like the British American Oil Co. (which would one day become Gulf, and then part of Petro-Canada), McColl-Frontenac (later to become Texaco, and eventually part of Esso in Canada) and Sun Oil were the market leaders.
In the 1920s, civic regulations in Toronto stipulated that a service station on a corner lot must cost not LESS than $7,500. Shell's standard station design at the time was an inexpensive box-like structure with a canopy, and not much else. Meeting that regulation was a bit of a problem, solved by facing the building with marble and stone, to create a rather memorable and expensive edifice.  Shell continued to expand its Canadian operations, moving its corporate headquarters from Montréal to Toronto in 1930 and adding a number of new stations to its network.  Royal Dutch/Shell was also busy in Western Canada, where it established a bulk fuel plant near Vancouver.  By 1928, Shell had a network of 19 service stations in B.C., and in 1929, Shell Oil Co. of B.C. was incorporated.
In 1939, exploration began in Western Canada, although it was the Shell Oil Co. of New York rather than Shell Canada that opened an exploration office in Calgary and started exploring the west.  Shell Canada became a fully-integrated petroleum company in 1957 when it bought out all the Canadian exploration and production properties of U.S.-based Shell Oil Co., and continued to expand its retail activities at the same time
In 1961, Shell purchased North Star Oil Ltd., which had 1,000 service stations, 350 bulk plants and a refinery in St. Boniface, Man. A year later, it bought out the assets of Canadian Oil (White Rose), which included 2,900 retail outlets, refineries in Sarnia, Ont. and Bowden, Alta., as well as oil and gas properties.
The name of this rapidly-growing company was officially changed to Shell Canada Limited in 1963, a year after Shell shares were offered publicly for the first time. Through the 1960s and 1970s, Shell Canada continued to grow, to explore for petroleum resources in a number of Canadian locations, and to introduce new technologies and products to the Canadian marketplace.  In 1993 Shell Canada acquired Canadian Turbo Inc. and Payless Gas Company Ltd. including 350 retail outlets, 29 bulk agencies and 40 cardlock facilities.
The late 1990s were a time of change for Shell Canada. In 1996, the Company divested its chemicals business to Shell International Chemicals and in 1999 sold its conventional crude oil business in the Plains area of Western Canada to Apache Canada. That year the first gas flowed from the Sable Offshore Energy Project located offshore Nova Scotia. Shell Canada has a 31.3 per cent interest in the project.
On the retail side, with the introduction of easyPAY, Shell became the first Canadian oil company using a radio chip embedded in a key tag to enable customers to simply drive up to the pumps, present their key chain tag to the pump face for automatic credit authorization, fill up and drive away. Probably the most significant event of 1999 was the announcement of the decision to build a joint-venture oil sands project. Called the Athabasca Oil Sands Project, the venture included the Muskeg River Mine in the Athabasca region of northern Alberta and the Scotford Upgrader near Edmonton.  (Source - Shell Canada)